Social Media in Lubbock Raises Issue of White Supremacy Because of Poster

The poster was a violation of Texas Tech policy but not necessarily for content.

LUBBOCK, TX - The Chair of the Lubbock County Democratic Party, Stuart Williams, posted an image on social media Tuesday evening and said people locally should be aware of “white supremacy.” 

Williams was harshly critical of what he saw. 

The image depicted a poster of Uncle Sam and the caption said, “I want you to love who you are.  Don’t apologize for being white.”

“Spotted at Holden Hall at Texas Tech University,” Williams said on a Facebook group for Lubbock Democrats.  Williams was harshly critical. 

Williams wrote, “Disgusting. Texas Tech must remove these immediately and reject white supremacy in all spaces!”

The image of the poster included a logo for amren.com.  The website’s about us section said, “The problems of race cannot be solved without adequate understanding. Attempts to gloss over the significance of race or even to deny its reality only make problems worse.”

A video in the about us section was entitled “White Identity: What It Is and Why It is Necessary.” 

The person who took the image gave permission for EverythingLubbock.com to republish it.  The image was taken about 5:00 pm Tuesday.  Williams said the same person who snapped the picture also took down the poster.  As of Wednesday morning, it was not replaced, and no other copies were located.

Williams said, “I think Holden Hall and the university need to look into it.”  

“I know it’s an open area,” Williams said.  “You can post what you want.  I think because of what was on there, I don’t consider it to be a joke.  It takes a lot of moxie to put that up there.”

“I hope the university roundly condemns that,” Williams said.  He also said the Democratic Headquarters in Lubbock was the target of racist graffiti earlier this year. 

“People need to know these things are happening,” Williams said.

Chris Cook, Texas Tech’s Managing Director, Office of Communications and Marketing, said, “This is a Department of History board, not a public board so this poster would have been a violation.”

“We do have public boards. This is not one of them,” Cook said. 

No determination was made by Texas Tech on the content of the poster because the violation was not for its content.  

 


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