Lubbock to Attack Salt Cedars in Defense of Local Water Supply

The City of Lubbock will try to make the most of Lake Alan Henry by starting a Salt Cedar eradication program.
LUBBOCK, TX -- The City of Lubbock will try to make the most of Lake Alan Henry by starting a Salt Cedar eradication program. The lake, along the South Fork of the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River, is up to 20 percent of the city’s water supply.

Public records said, “Within the last couple of years, Salt Cedar has begun spreading throughout the watershed along the banks of the river and associated tributaries.”

Those same records said, “The Salt Cedar consumes a large amount of water that might otherwise be impounded in the Lake and subsequently used as part of the City’s water supply.”

The city has gone out for bids to hire a company that can spray herbicide on the Salt Cedar shrubs in or near the banks of the Double Mountain Fork. The idea is to use a helicopter to avoid the need for travelling on private property by foot or by vehicle.

The area to be treated starts at the intersection of the Double Mountain Fork with U.S. Highway 84 and goes west approximately four miles. Bids are due May 8 and bid documents do not say how much money has been set aside for the project.

Some researchers have said a large Salt Cedar shrub can use 200 gallons of water or more every day. Others have said a single plant would use no more than 32 gallons a day.
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