Tim Tadlock Reflects on Tech's run to Omaha

It was a painful end to an incredible season. A historic run that the Skip Bertman National Coach of the Year is just now starting to process.
It was a painful end to an incredible season. A historic run that the Skip Bertman National Coach of the Year is just now starting to process.

"This group really, from the get go was really good as far as their camaraderie and their character and how they went about their business everyday," said Tim Tadlock, Texas Tech Head Baseball Coach.

That special group did more than any other group before it, taking Texas Tech to its first ever super regional and its first trip to the College World Series in Omaha. Every must-win game, was a nail biter.

"The biggest thing is every time we had adversity they understood it was for a reason and that was just another time when we said 'Ok look, we don't know why we're getting this but let's deal with this and let's go do the best we can in this next game," said Tadlock.

They did just that shutting out Miami 4-0 to become the Coral Gables Regional Champions.

"It kind of leaves you speechless and those are times as coaches you really want to step back and go, let's watch these guys, let's watch how fun this is for them."

The Red Raiders were regional champs for the first time ever. Headed to a super regional for the first time in history and it would unfold right in front of their home crowd.  

"It was really just unbelievable. To be able to bring a super regional to Lubbock - sell it out, in 40 minutes, compared to winning a regional in Miami with not many of our fans, obviously it means, it means a little more because you're going to Omaha and it means a little more to even bring it to your own ballpark." 

Tech won back-to-back shutouts to sweep College of Charleston in front of a sold out crowd.

"Without the bodies, without all the voices in the stands, I'm not sure you win two games 1-0. I'm convinced everybody in that ballpark helped us win that super."

Later that week, the guys found themselves at college baseball's biggest stage.

"A lot of guys smiling, a lot of guys pinching themselves because we're in Omaha and we've got a game to play we're not just here to watch."

In Omaha the stakes are high, and with that so are the emotions.

"There was a moment where Zach (Davis) slid in, he smiled, he looked to the dugout and it's one of those moments whether you win or lose, you always keep," said Tadlock, "because you see a kid and he goes, he's like 'I did it' and so, pretty neat."

Tech's trip to Omaha was shorter than they had hoped for, losing its first two games, both decided by a single run.

"You feel for them you tell them you love them and you tell them you're proud of them. At the same time at that point in the year you need to give them 24 hours, to really probably hurt a little bit, because it did hurt."

But even in that pain are memories of a special team, with special people, that will last forever.     

"What you can't take away is the moments, again. You can't take away the relationships. Those are the things that in 30 years you're going to look back and we'll all be sitting on the porch and we'll go that was really neat. I mean, those times were really special."     

"It feels like to me any baseball season, nearly everyone I've been a part of I mean you try to win the whole thing. We want to get to the World Series and we expect to win when we get there. Does that mean it's going to happen? No, but we're going to try, I mean obviously we're going to try."

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Most Recent Local News