State Politicians Show Support for Proposition 6

State leaders from Lubbock joined the Texas Speaker of the House Tuesday to show their support for proposition 6, dealing with state water funds.
State leaders from Lubbock joined the Texas Speaker of the House Tuesday to show their support for proposition 6, dealing with state water funds.

Joe Straus, Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives, was joined by State Representatives John Frullo, Ken King, and Charles Perry, as well as State Senator Robert Duncan, Tuesday to discuss why they all support proposition 6.

Prop 6 is on the current ballot, and if it passes it will move $2 billion from the state's rainy day fund and use that money to fund water projects and conservation across the state.

Straus said the drought has cost the stat $11 billion dollars, and that this is a step that the legislature is taking to actually implement the state water plan, which has been around for years.

"Great to be standing here with leaders from Lubbock and this entire region," Straus said.

"In order for our children and our grandchildren to have opportunities and our economy to grow, we have to have a sustainable supply of water," Straus said.

"Rural Texas agriculture and all of our rural communities that have aging infrastructure, that need assistance, in order to provide for their water supplies and for the efficient removal of the refuse in the water, this will go a a long way toward doing that," Senator Duncan said in support of the measure.

Straus said he has been touring the state, trying to gain support for the measure, as this is a constitutional amendment, and Straus said they typically see lower voter turn out during these elections.

Straus said 10% of the fund is supposed to go to rural Texas, with another 20% going to conservation and agriculture. Some opponents of he measure say they worry about how much conservation the measure would actually encourage. Straus said he's not worried about that.

"I think you're going to see a lot of our infrastructure replacement projects and that sort of thing, and again, in agriculture, with irrigation technology, rapidly improving and innovating, I don't think that's going to be a problem at all," Straus said.

There is a water plan, found here. Straus said if this measure passes, the plans that go into effect are supposed to meet those return percents in order to be selected.
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