Walking May Cut Breast Cancer Risk

Certain risk factors, like age and race, can't be changed. But others, like body weight and physical activity, are modifiable.
Age

Your breast cancer risk rises with age, from one in 227 for a 30-year-old woman to 1 in 26 for a woman over 70.

Previous Breast Cancer

You're more likely to get breast cancer if you've had it before, and women who've had cancer in one breast are more likely to get it in the other.

Family History

Your breast cancer risk increases if your mother, sister or daughter has been diagnosed with the disease. Your risk is also higher if you've had more than one relative on your mother or father's side with breast cancer.

Learn more about the family history patterns that could raise your risk.

Genetic Mutations

Women with mutations in the genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 are five times more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, but less than 1 percent of women have these mutations.

Learn more about the family history patterns that could hint at a BRCA gene mutation.

Dense Breasts

Your breast cancer risk increases if you have dense breast tissue as opposed to fatty tissue.

Learn more about the tests that can reveal whether you have dense breast tissue.

Non-Cancerous Breast Changes

Breast changes known as atypical hyperplasia (an increase in abnormal breast tissue), ductal carcinoma in situ (abnormal cells in the lining of the breast ducts) and lobular carcinoma in situ (abnormal cells in the milk-producing glands) increase the risk of cancer.

Learn more about the tests that can reveal whether you have non-cancerous breast changes.

Early Periods

Women who had their first period before age 12 have a higher breast cancer risk.

Pregnancy

Your breast cancer risk increases if you have children after age 30 or have no children at all. Your risk decreases if you have children before age 20.

Late Menopause

Women who reach menopause after age 55 have a higher breast cancer risk.

Hormone Therapy

Taking estrogen and progestin supplements for more than five years increases the risk of breast cancer.

Radiation to the Chest

Your breast cancer risk increases if you've had radiation therapy to the chest to treat cancer, particularly during puberty.

Body Weight and Physical Activity

Women who are overweight or obese have a higher breast cancer risk. Being physically inactive might also increase your risk. The good news: Regular exercise might help lower your risk, and it can also help you lose weight, a double benefit.

Alcohol Consumption

Consuming more than one alcoholic drink per day raises the risk of breast cancer.

The Drug DES

Women who took the drug diethylstilbestrol, or DES, during pregnancy to prevent a miscarriage might have an increased breast cancer risk. The drug was used between 1938 and 1971.

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding might lower your breast cancer risk.

Race

White women have the highest breast cancer rates in the United States, but African-American women are more likely to die from breast cancer, in part because it's often found later when it's harder to treat.

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