LUBBOCK, Texas (Press Release) —

The following is a press release from Lubbock Independent School District

In the first scores to be released since 2019, Lubbock ISD has earned a B in the Texas Education Agency’s Accountability Rating System.

The overall district rating improved from an 86 in 2019 to an 87 in 2022, with campuses around the district showing significant improvement.

For the first time since the implementation of the A-F rating system, all four of Lubbock ISD’s comprehensive high schools earned a B rating: Coronado, Estacado, Lubbock High, and Monterey. Talkington School for Young Women Leaders earned an A, or 99, the highest score earned by any Lubbock ISD campus.

Dunbar College Preparatory Academy has increased their rating from a F in 2019 to a C in 2022, releasing the campus from a decade’s worth of state sanctions. Wester Elementary School showed the most growth since 2019, jumping from F to A in just three years.

These campuses are two of the seven that grew by at least two letter grades: Brown, Centennial, McWhorter, Overton, and Stewart elementary schools grew from a D to B rating.

In 2019, 19 campuses were rated as an A or B; in 2022, there are 31. The number of D and F campuses has been reduced from 11 in 2019 to 7 in 2022.

30 campuses earned 104 distinctions, which are awarded for outstanding performance in closing student achievement gaps. Honey Elementary School and Lubbock High School earned all but one distinction; Roberts, Smith, Whiteside, Wolffarth, and Talkington earned all eligible distinctions.

Most notably, the Lubbock ISD Board of Trustees student outcome goals include a North Star goal of 80% of Lubbock ISD students served in A or B campuses by 2026. This year’s ratings reflect the work of staff and students through the challenges of the last two years, with 75% of students being served in A or B campuses in 2022 compared to 42% in 2019.

Established by House Bill 22 during the 85th Texas Legislature, the A–F accountability system provides a view of the academic performance of Texas public schools based on three domains: Student Achievement, School Progress, and Closing the Gaps.

This year, to align with Senate Bill 1365, districts and campuses received an A, B or C rating or were assigned a label of Not Rated: Senate Bill 1365, both overall and in each domain. This Not Rated: Senate Bill 1365 label was applied when the domain or overall scaled score for a district or campus was less than 70. 

End of press release