Domestic water well layer added to HPWD interactive map

Local News

(Photo provided by High Plains Underground Water Conservation District No. 1.)

LUBBOCK, Texas (NEWS RELEASE) — The following is a news release from the HPWD:

The High Plains Underground Water Conservation District (HPWD) has added a new domestic water well layer to its interactive map feature (map.hpwd.org). 

“Since 2013, the interactive map has been used by constituents to obtain data for permitted wells in the District. However, our staff members also receive a number of questions regarding the location and density of smaller domestic water wells,” said HPWD General Manager Jason Coleman.

HPWD does not require registration of small capacity wells, which are exempt from permitting and spacing requirements.  However, staff can query state well reports, obtain domestic well data, and show areas of greatest activity.

These data are included in the new domestic wells layer on the HPWD interactive map. To access it, go to map.hpwd.org.  Zoom to your area of interest and select the “Wells” tab on the menu bar. Be sure to turn off the default “Annual Observation Wells” layer and turn on the “Domestic Wells” layer at the bottom of the pull-down menu. 

Domestic well locations are depicted by an orange dot. The well count in an area is shown by varying shades of blue. The lighter shades indicate areas with fewer wells while the dark blue shades show areas with a greater concentration of wells. Activating the map legend provides an explanation of the color scheme associated with this layer.

“This information may prove helpful to those interested in purchasing land for a home outside a town or city. An increasing number of small wells are being drilled to supply water for residences in various subdivisions,” said Coleman.  Rapid housing development in certain portions of the District’s service area was discussed during HPWD County Advisory Committee meetings in March 2020.

“The new feature gives an idea of the concentration of smaller wells on a section (or sections) of land of interest. The Board of Directors hope that this new feature will be beneficial to constituents. We welcome any and all feedback regarding this new web tool,” said Coleman.

Created in 1951 by local residents and the Texas Legislature, the High Plains Water District works to conserve, preserve, protect, and prevent the waste of underground water within its 16-county service area. HPWD is the first groundwater conservation district created in Texas.

Be sure to “like” the High Plains Water District Facebook page to receive updates on district activities or follow us on Twitter at @HPUWCD. Visit our website at www.hpwd.org.

(News release from the High Plains Underground Water Conservation District No. 1)

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