9 alleged ‘Hogg Life’ gang members, 7 from Amarillo, charged with drug trafficking

State & Regional

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AMARILLO, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) – Nine alleged members of the “Hogg Life” gang have been charged with federal drug crimes, according to Acting U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas Prerak Shah.

After being indicted last Wednesday, several of the defendants made initial appearances in court on Monday.

The Attorney’s Office reported that on Friday, law enforcement arrested several of the defendants in what was noted as a “multi-pronged operation”, and recovered nearly a kilogram of bulk marijuana, multiple grams of psilocybin (hallucinogenic mushrooms), oxycontin, alprazolam, four pistols, and more than $17,000 in cash.

The seizure, noted the Office, followed a May search warrant in which officers recovered more than 125 pounds of bulk marijuana, THC products, and psilocybin products, and over $63,000 in cash from members of the “Hogg Life” gang.   

Court documents said that the investigation began in spring of 2018, after anonymous callers reported interstate drug trafficking to the Amarillo Police Department. At least one tipster reported that traffickers were regularly posting about their dealings on Snapchat.

In spring of 2020, a defendant told the Amarillo Police Department’s Narcotics Unit that the “Hogg Life” group, a Crips gang, was trafficking marijuana. The office noted that defendant said Texas dealers mailed money to a supplier in California in exchange for drugs, which were then shipped through the U.S. Postal Service and FedEx.

The defendant also said, according to the office, the operation was being run through Snapchat, and identified several of the dealers’ accounts. The account belonging to the supplier was also identified, reportedly branding narcotics with “Dank of America.”

After an undercover investigation with local Amarillo dealers, the office said “videos and and images captured from their accounts show the cultivation, packaging, and advertisement of large quantities of marijuana, psilocybin mushrooms, and other THC products.  The local “Hogg Life” gang members allegedly sold marijuana and THC products with their own brand name, “No Boof.” “

A detailed timeline previously reported on MyHighPlains.com can be found here.

Those charged include:

  • Demarcus Dave Grabert, aka “Rackz,” 24, charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, two counts of distribution of Psilocin, one count of distribution of marijuana, and one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana.
  • Grant Leonard Glover, 33 charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, one count of distribution of psilocin, and one count of distribution of marijuana.
  • Tremaine Devante Watson, aka “T-watt,” 29, charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, one count of distribution of psilocin, one count of distribution of marijuana, and one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana.
  • Ashton Andrew Burns, aka “Trayo,” 31, charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances and possession of a firearm by a prohibited person.  
  • Doshon Lee Johnson, aka “Nolia Boy Tat,” 24, charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances and one count of distribution of psilocin
  • Andre Shemar Lewis, aka “30,” 25, charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances and one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana
  • Chandler Geveon Smith, aka “Lil Chan,” 23, charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances
  • Davona Traveil Carter, 28, charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances and one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana

One defendant, whose name is sealed, was noted by the office as a fugitive.

Jail records note Carter as from Plainview, Texas, and Watson from Florida. The other defendants were noted as from Amarillo.

“An indictment is merely an allegation of criminal conduct, not evidence. All defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.” said the office. However, if convicted, the defendants could face up to 40 years in prison.

The investigation was conducted by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the Amarillo Police Department, with the help of the U.S. Marshals Service.

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