Counties with the highest rate of food insecurity in Texas

State & Regional

(Photo from Stacker.com via the Nexstar Media Wire; Source: Aualliso//Wikimedia Commons)

(STACKER.COM) — Every county in the United States is home to people experiencing food insecurity, defined by the nonprofit Feeding America as “a lack of consistent access to enough food for every person in a household to live an active, healthy life.”

The USDA estimates that 89.5% of U.S. households were food secure throughout 2019—that’s 116.0 million people. The COVID-19 pandemic put further strain on households already experiencing food hardship, with Feeding America estimating that 42 million people, or 1 in 8 Americans, may experience food insecurity in 2021. This is a slight improvement from 2020 numbers but still represents an enormous burden for millions of children and adults.

Stacker compiled a list of counties in Texas with the highest rate of food insecurity using data from Feeding America. Counties are ranked by highest percent of population with food insecurity as of 2019.

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#50. Freestone County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.4% (3,430 total)
— 59.6% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 24.4% (1,100 total)
— 67.1% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,670,000
— Cost per meal: $2.85

25or6to4 // Wikimedia Commons

#49. Kleberg County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.4% (5,390 total)
— 59.6% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 24.5% (1,840 total)
— 67.8% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $2,638,000
— Cost per meal: $2.86

Renelibrary // Wikimedia Commons

#48. Cass County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.5% (5,270 total)
— 60.6% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 27.4% (1,860 total)
— 87.7% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $2,602,000
— Cost per meal: $2.89

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#47. Cameron County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.5% (73,730 total)
— 60.6% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 25.7% (33,380 total)
— 76.0% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $29,810,000
— Cost per meal: $2.37

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#46. Montague County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.7% (3,440 total)
— 62.4% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 23.3% (1,040 total)
— 59.6% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,812,000
— Cost per meal: $3.08

Matthew Rutledge // Wikimedia Commons

#45. Loving County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.8% (20 total)
— 63.3% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 21.4% (10 total)
— 46.6% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $10,000
— Cost per meal: $2.97

Renelibrary // Wikimedia Commons

#44. Swisher County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.8% (1,320 total)
— 63.3% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 28.4% (530 total)
— 94.5% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $682,000
— Cost per meal: $3.02

Renelibrary // Wikimedia Commons

#43. Leon County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.8% (3,070 total)
— 63.3% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.5% (1,030 total)
— 81.5% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,472,000
— Cost per meal: $2.80

Billy Hathorn // Wikimedia Commons

#42. Eastland County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.8% (3,260 total)
— 63.3% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 24.6% (940 total)
— 68.5% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,601,000
— Cost per meal: $2.87

Aualliso // Wikimedia Commons

#41. Kinney County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.9% (660 total)
— 64.2% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 30.1% (140 total)
— 106.2% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $256,000
— Cost per meal: $2.27

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#40. McCulloch County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.9% (1,440 total)
— 64.2% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 23.2% (420 total)
— 58.9% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $691,000
— Cost per meal: $2.81

Renelibrary // Wikimedia Commons

#39. Houston County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.9% (4,110 total)
— 64.2% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 28.8% (1,290 total)
— 97.3% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,862,000
— Cost per meal: $2.65

Billy Hathorn // Wikimedia Commons

#38. Shelby County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.9% (4,530 total)
— 64.2% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 28.8% (1,910 total)
— 97.3% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $2,223,000
— Cost per meal: $2.87

Wrbalusek // Wikimedia Commons

#37. Jasper County

– Food insecurity rate: 17.9% (6,340 total)
— 64.2% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 27.7% (2,370 total)
— 89.7% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $3,063,000
— Cost per meal: $2.83

Renelibrary // Wikimedia Commons

#36. Somervell County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.0% (1,590 total)
— 65.1% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 21.9% (440 total)
— 50.0% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $793,000
— Cost per meal: $2.92

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#35. Morris County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.0% (2,220 total)
— 65.1% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 28.6% (810 total)
— 95.9% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,064,000
— Cost per meal: $2.80

JERRYE & ROY KLOTZ M.D. // Wikimedia Commons

#34. Maverick County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.0% (10,500 total)
— 65.1% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.4% (4,830 total)
— 80.8% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $3,947,000
— Cost per meal: $2.20

Distrito Medico Monterrey // Flickr

#33. Hidalgo County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.0% (153,810 total)
— 65.1% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.4% (74,290 total)
— 80.8% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $63,826,000
— Cost per meal: $2.43

Aualliso // Wikimedia Commons

#32. Dickens County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.1% (400 total)
— 66.1% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 22.7% (100 total)
— 55.5% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $212,000
— Cost per meal: $3.10

Michael Barera // Wikimedia Commons

#31. Delta County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.1% (950 total)
— 66.1% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 27.4% (340 total)
— 87.7% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $451,000
— Cost per meal: $2.78

Adavyd // Wikimedia Commons

#30. Lamar County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.1% (9,000 total)
— 66.1% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.1% (3,080 total)
— 78.8% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $4,117,000
— Cost per meal: $2.68

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#29. Haskell County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.2% (1,040 total)
— 67.0% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 24.6% (260 total)
— 68.5% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $527,000
— Cost per meal: $2.97

Renelibrary // Wikimedia Commons

#28. Marion County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.2% (1,820 total)
— 67.0% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 29.9% (540 total)
— 104.8% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $916,000
— Cost per meal: $2.94

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#27. Aransas County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.2% (4,450 total)
— 67.0% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.5% (1,220 total)
— 81.5% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $2,290,000
— Cost per meal: $3.01

Michael Barera // Wikimedia Commons

#26. Red River County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.3% (2,230 total)
— 67.9% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 25.6% (630 total)
— 75.3% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,050,000
— Cost per meal: $2.75

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#25. Tyler County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.4% (3,950 total)
— 68.8% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.6% (1,110 total)
— 82.2% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,920,000
— Cost per meal: $2.84

Jim Evans // Wikimedia Commons

#24. Polk County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.4% (8,990 total)
— 68.8% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 28.6% (2,840 total)
— 95.9% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $4,353,000
— Cost per meal: $2.83

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#23. Jim Hogg County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.5% (970 total)
— 69.7% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 31.8% (530 total)
— 117.8% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $443,000
— Cost per meal: $2.67

Library of Congress

#22. Dawson County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.5% (2,370 total)
— 69.7% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.0% (860 total)
— 78.1% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,238,000
— Cost per meal: $3.05

Aualliso // Wikimedia Commons

#21. Throckmorton County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.7% (270 total)
— 71.6% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 25.5% (60 total)
— 74.7% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $140,000
— Cost per meal: $3.04

Billy Hathorn // Wikimedia Commons

#20. Kimble County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.7% (820 total)
— 71.6% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 27.2% (250 total)
— 86.3% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $371,000
— Cost per meal: $2.65

Jpo tx113 // Wikimedia Commons

#19. Trinity County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.8% (2,750 total)
— 72.5% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 29.1% (870 total)
— 99.3% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,329,000
— Cost per meal: $2.83

Matthew T Rader // Wikimedia Commons

#18. Willacy County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.8% (4,050 total)
— 72.5% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 29.3% (1,520 total)
— 100.7% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,551,000
— Cost per meal: $2.24

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#17. Nacogdoches County

– Food insecurity rate: 18.8% (12,290 total)
— 72.5% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.1% (3,950 total)
— 78.8% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $6,192,000
— Cost per meal: $2.95

Aualliso // Wikimedia Commons

#16. Kent County

– Food insecurity rate: 19.0% (120 total)
— 74.3% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 21.2% (30 total)
— 45.2% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $61,000
— Cost per meal: $2.96

Travis K. Witt // Wikimedia Commons

#15. Culberson County

– Food insecurity rate: 19.0% (420 total)
— 74.3% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 34.6% (220 total)
— 137.0% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $212,000
— Cost per meal: $2.95

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#14. Wilbarger County

– Food insecurity rate: 19.0% (2,440 total)
— 74.3% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.5% (760 total)
— 81.5% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,227,000
— Cost per meal: $2.94

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#13. Falls County

– Food insecurity rate: 19.1% (3,310 total)
— 75.2% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 30.4% (1,120 total)
— 108.2% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,503,000
— Cost per meal: $2.66

Liveon001 // Wikimedia Commons

#12. Hall County

– Food insecurity rate: 19.2% (580 total)
— 76.1% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 26.7% (180 total)
— 82.9% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $303,000
— Cost per meal: $3.06

Billy Hathorn // Wikimedia Commons

#11. Zapata County

– Food insecurity rate: 19.4% (2,780 total)
— 78.0% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 28.0% (1,340 total)
— 91.8% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,166,000
— Cost per meal: $2.45

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#10. Newton County

– Food insecurity rate: 19.9% (2,760 total)
— 82.6% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 30.9% (870 total)
— 111.6% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,375,000
— Cost per meal: $2.91

Billy Hathorn // Wikimedia Commons

#9. Dimmit County

– Food insecurity rate: 20.1% (2,100 total)
— 84.4% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 30.1% (920 total)
— 106.2% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $853,000
— Cost per meal: $2.38

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#8. Sabine County

– Food insecurity rate: 20.6% (2,150 total)
— 89.0% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 33.0% (650 total)
— 126.0% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,078,000
— Cost per meal: $2.93

Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

#7. Real County

– Food insecurity rate: 20.7% (710 total)
— 89.9% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 31.4% (280 total)
— 115.1% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $320,000
— Cost per meal: $2.64

Renelibrary // Wikimedia Commons

#6. San Augustine County

– Food insecurity rate: 21.0% (1,740 total)
— 92.7% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 30.7% (500 total)
— 110.3% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $854,000
— Cost per meal: $2.87

Carol M. Highsmith // Wikimedia Commons

#5. Starr County

– Food insecurity rate: 21.1% (13,550 total)
— 93.6% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 31.6% (6,680 total)
— 116.4% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $6,073,000
— Cost per meal: $2.62

Billy Hathorn // Wikimedia Commons

#4. Zavala County

– Food insecurity rate: 21.5% (2,590 total)
— 97.2% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 37.3% (1,330 total)
— 155.5% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $1,033,000
— Cost per meal: $2.33

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#3. Brooks County

– Food insecurity rate: 22.0% (1,570 total)
— 101.8% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 33.3% (630 total)
— 128.1% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $676,000
— Cost per meal: $2.52

Aualliso // Wikimedia Commons

#2. Cottle County

– Food insecurity rate: 23.1% (380 total)
— 111.9% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 34.5% (180 total)
— 136.3% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $195,000
— Cost per meal: $2.99

Talshiarr // Wikimedia Commons

#1. Presidio County

– Food insecurity rate: 24.2% (1,690 total)
— 122.0% higher than national average
– Child food insecurity rate: 34.7% (630 total)
— 137.7% higher than national average
– Annual food budget shortfall: $919,000
— Cost per meal: $3.18

(Information from Stacker.com via the Nexstar Media Wire)

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