LUBBOCK, Texas — Mary Johnson, the Hobbs mother who stabbed her son to death and stabbed herself, is at a Lubbock hospital recovering from self-inflicted stab wounds. 

11-year-old who died told investigator his mother stabbed him

People who know Johnson said this tragedy was inevitable as she showed signs of a mental health crisis, which were especially noticeable on her social media.

EverythingLubbock.com spoke with StarCare Specialty Health System Crisis Specialist, Bobby Carter, who said that worst thing you can do when you see signs like these, is nothing.

“If you see someone face-to-face acting in a way that maybe they wouldn’t normally act, maybe you know them, maybe they’re posting things online that anything is out of the ordinary. You need to tell someone,” said Carter.

Carter suggested listening to the people around you. If they start saying or doing things that don’t make sense, talk to them. 

If you think they could eventually harm themselves or others, call a local mental health professional or facility.

If the person is in immediate danger, call 9-1-1.

But above everything else, Carter said to just be there for them.

So how did mental crisis lead to murder?

Carter explained that while there is no crystal ball to tell whether or not intervention would have prevented the stabbing Sunday, we should be talking about mental health like what it is, a medical condition.

“The stigma is over,” Carter said. “You know, there are people out there that are struggling, you know. Everybody struggles.”

According to Kingston PD, there were frequent disturbance calls made to the family’s house when they lived in Oklahoma.

The Lea County Sheriff’s Office said at least two incidents of abuse or neglect of Buddy were reported in Oklahoma, but since the family arrived in New Mexico less than two months ago, there were none.

Oklahoma Child Protective Services couldn’t confirm whether they were the ones investigating the abuse allegations because of federal and state privacy laws. 

They could tell us in situations like this, circumstances evolve quickly, so it’s important that if you see something, you report it to your local child protective services and keep reporting if the problem persists.

“Admit the fact that it’s okay not to be okay and also that it’s okay for your people not to be okay,” he said.