US Forest Service accused of failing to protect meadow mouse

State & Regional

FILE – This Nov. 1, 2016, file photo, provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows Debra Hill weighing a New Mexico meadow jumping mouse, which was trapped during survey efforts on the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, N.M. Environmentalists have sued again over the endangered mouse found only in parts of New Mexico and Arizona. In the latest legal filing, the Center for Biological Diversity and the Maricopa Audubon Society allege that the U.S. Forest Service has failed to protect the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse and its habitat in the Sacramento Mountains from cattle grazing. (Stacey Stanford/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)

CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — Environmentalists have sued again over an endangered mouse found only in parts of New Mexico and Arizona.

The latest legal filing by the Center for Biological Diversity and the Maricopa Audubon Society centers on habitat of the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse in southern New Mexico’s Sacramento Mountains.

The claim alleges that the U.S. Forest Service has failed to protect the mouse and its habitat from cattle grazing.

The tiny rodent was listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2014.

About 22 square miles of land in New Mexico and Arizona are designated as critical habitat for the mouse.

(Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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